Category Archives: Opportunities

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Creating Accessible Digital Course Content Webinar

Creating Accessible Digital Course Content Webinar

 July 30th, 11:00am to 12:00pm

August 13th (repeat session), 2:00pm to 3:00pm 

Register for the webinar on July 30th

Register for the repeat webinar on August 13th

CUNY Assistive Technology Services and the Media Accessibility Project invite you to join our live webinar to learn how to create accessible digital course content. This webinar is perfect for faculty in preparing course materials for the new semester and for those who want to increase their awareness on the importance of accessible content. We will be going over what makes a document accessible as well as steps on how to turn Microsoft Word and PDF documents into accessible content for students with all types of abilities and disabilities.

July 30th webinar link [zoom.us]

August 13th webinar link [zoom.us]

Due Sep 1 | Call for Book Chapters

The History of Sub-Saharan African Literatures on Film

Cinematic adaptations of sub-Saharan African literatures draw from a wide range of genres from West African folktales to Zulu legends, from Hausa popular literature to graphic novels, war narratives or Afro Bubblegum art. Departing from the notion that, like literature and cinema, cinematic adaptations are influenced by historical moments and political, social and economic transitions, The History of Sub-Saharan African Literatures on Film seeks chapter proposals that examine adaptations of African literatures–in their multilingual and multicultural contexts–in order to provide a comprehensive volume that spans linguistic regions and will serve as a resource to specialists and non-specialists alike. The volume aims to be a sort of adaptation archive and thus strongly urges chapter proposals that focus on Afrophone and Europhone countries throughout the sub-Saharan region. Moreover, if we consider adaptation as “réécriture” (re-writing) (Tcheuyap 2005), our study of multiple rewritings across time and space seeks to contribute to a rewriting or a rethinking of history, a reformulation of theories and even a rethinking or new direction for adaptation studies.

In individual chapters, the historical, political, social and/or economic contexts should frame discussions about, for instance, aesthetic choices in adaptation, what adaptation might bring to the discussion, or the choice itself of what to adapt to the screen and which screen, who chooses to adapt and why. Authors might focus on the aspect of storytelling through montage, framing, setting or on filmmaking as language, other language choices in films, music in adaptations, readership and viewership, and whether or how adaptation approaches have changed in response to or as a result of a particular historical moment or event. Contributors may choose to take up additional questions, such as: How have authorial approaches, storytelling techniques and media changed throughout the region’s cinematic history? How do storytellers deploy narrative techniques, approach narrative units and structures, and how do narrative styles merge or differ with regard to the choice of medium? What do filmmakers’ narrative choices bring to adaptation and what do those choices tell us about adaptation? Further, if African filmmaking has relied on the discourses and theoretical positioning in African literatures, how has the medium of film articulated those discourses and theories and expanded upon them? Altered them? How much has adaptation played a role in this process? Interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged, including from the fields of postcolonial theory, cultural studies, literary theory, translation theory, queer theory.

Chapters should situate adaptation within a particular historical, political, social or economic moment or time period, such as:

– First generation African filmmaking and adaptation, the Algiers Charter (1969) and political and aesthetic aims of African cinema, including the adaptation of myths, folktales, legends, plays, short stories and novels

– Adaptation, revolutions and revolutionary aesthetics and techniques; national identity and politics

– Popular media – popular theatre, market literature, video production; adaptation and Nollywood, Kannywood, Ghallywood, and in video production in Côte d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso, Gabon, Cameroon, Tanzania

– Adaptations of war narratives, child soldier narratives

-Adaptations and African screen media in the 21st century, modes of production, distribution, or of viewing

– Film languages, local and international actors, professional and non-professional actors, co-productions, global collaborations

Please submit a 250-300-word abstract with your name, title and affiliation to the editor, Dr. Sara Hanaburgh hanaburs@stjohns.edu by September 1, 2019. Include “Call for Book Chapters” in email subject. Accepted abstracts will be notified by September 20. Submission of full chapters (5,000-8,000 words) by February 20, 2020.

This book is under contract with Bloomsbury as part of the growing series, The History of World Literatures on Film, eds. Greg Semenza and Robert Hasenfratz.

Sara Hanaburgh, Ph. D

Assistant Professor of French

Department of Languages and Literatures

Faculty Mentor, International House

St. John’s University (Queens, NY)

hanaburs@stjohns.edu

 

Due Aug 12 | Applications for Advising Fellow Opening for M.A. in Liberal Studies 2019-2020

Advising Fellow Program – Fall 2019

The Advising Fellow Program aims to provide vital academic support to students in the MA in Liberal Studies (MALS) program while they study at the Graduate Center. MALS is looking to appoint one additional advising fellow for the academic year 2019-2020; the provisional start date is October 1, 2019. The Advising Fellows will provide individualized academic support to the master’s students, guiding them in choosing courses, managing their work loads and meeting academic challenges, and enlisting faculty mentors to supervise their theses. The Fellows will be advanced doctoral students who have already successfully navigated their own Graduate Center course requirements and who will be able to share their wisdom and experience with the master’s students. Carefully chosen for their interpersonal skills and judgment, the Fellows will be accessible and open to students while also providing academic guidance. Continue reading Due Aug 12 | Applications for Advising Fellow Opening for M.A. in Liberal Studies 2019-2020

Due Sep 30 | NEMLA CFP: Theorizing Transmediality in its Transnational Contexts

Panel Co-Directors: Leonardo Nole’ and Joseph Boisvere

Theorizing Transmediality in its Transnational Contexts

The study of literature has always relied upon the traversal of borders of various kinds, both inter and intra nationally. This panel will engage with issues of literary study across geographical and cultural borders as well as the boundaries between literary and audio-visual media in the contemporary digital age. As the field of screen studies has been informed by theoretical frameworks originating in the field of literary studies, we ask how the interpretation of literary texts is informed by disciplines that are only now, in the digital age, being born. As digital technologies intensify movement of media across traditional notions of borders between various communities, how can we model the traversal of literary analysis across not only such borders but the bounds of medium? In the digital age of increasing access to literary and audio/visual materials, how is transmediality related to transnational and transcultural transposition? We welcome papers that discuss the engagement with texts both on the page and on the screen from a theoretical or hermeneutical perspective as well as papers that apply this logic to specific case studies.

Deadline for submissions: September 30, 2019.

250-word abstracts must be submitted online through the NeMLA website at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18091 [cfplist.com]before September 30, 2019. Individual presentations should not be longer than 7-8 minutes, in order to have enough time for the discussion.

June 17 | Workshops

Time Management Workshop
Monday, June 17, 2019, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Graduate Center, room 3312

In this workshop, we will discuss how to schedule time and keep oneself accountable to academic research and writing goals and deadlines, particularly during unstructured time periods such as the summer. Please RSVP: If you’re planning on coming to our workshop, please RSVP using our event registration form.

Companionable Writing (Summer 2019)
Monday, June 3, 2019 – Thursday, July 27, 2019
See weekly schedule below.
Graduate Center, room 3312

Weekly Schedule
In June and July, Writing Services will be hosting regular Companionable Writing sessions on the following days and times:

  • Mondays, 2-4pm through July 29
  • Tuesdays, 10am-12noon through July 30
  • Wednesdays, 2-4pm through July 31
  • Wednesday, 5-7pm on June 12, 19, and 26
  • Thursdays, 10am-12noon through July 25

Feel free to join us for a single day, once a week, or whenever your schedule allows.

About Companionable Writing

What is Companionable Writing? Companionable Writing is an opportunity to spend two solid hours of work either in person or digitally with other people doing the same thing. A writing consultant will host each session.

What happens at a session? Think of a session as Sustained Silent Writing time. This is a relaxed environment, you can drop in and out as you need. If you wish to set a goal for the session you can do so. At the end of the session we may chitchat for a bit in a companionable way.

Where do I go? Most sessions take place in room 3312. In the event that a session takes place in another location, a sign will be posted on 3312.

How do I join remotely? To join remotely send an email to writinghelp@gc.cuny.edu or a tweet to @gcwwritinghelp at least fifteen minutes before the start of the session and let us know you would like to join. You will then get an invite to a digital platform that will allow you to see and speak to the room and allow people in the room to see and speak to you.

What else do I need to know? We provide coffee and tea. Feel free to bring snacks. There are comfortable rolling chairs and a limited number of outlets. There may be computers accessible in a nearby room.

Questions?

If you have further questions, or want to join us remotely, please email writinghelp@gc.cuny.edu.

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation 2019 New Directions Fellowships

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has invited the Graduate Center, along with a limited number of other institutions, to participate in the 2019 New Directions Fellowships competition.  Fellowship Guidelines are here and contain important information about the specifics of the proposal and other required materials.

The New Directions Fellowships provide support for exceptional faculty members in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, who received their doctorates between six and twelve years ago (2007 and 2013).  Both central line and consortial doctoral faculty are eligible.  The fellowships enable them to pursue systematic training outside their own special fields, and are intended to support the acquisition of new academic competencies needed for the pursuit of a cross-disciplinary research agenda.  Unlike other fellowship awards, this program does not aim to facilitate short-term outcomes, such as completion of a book.  Rather, New Directions Fellowships are meant to be viewed as longer-term investments in scholars’ intellectual range and productivity.

Applicants should submit the following documents to the Office of the Provost (by email attachments to Rachel Sponzo rsponzo@gc.cuny.edu) no later than Friday, September 6, 2019:

  1. project summary of no more than 300 words.
  2. proposal of no more than 2,000 words, providing an explanation of the overall significance of the research being undertaken and how the proposed new direction will assist in the development of the field.
  3. budget and budget narrative, following the Mellon guidelines. It is not necessary to use the Mellon budget template at this time.
  4. A letter of recommendation from your EO or department chair, which should address your preparation and the relationship of the “new direction” to the your research and pedagogy.  An additional letter of recommendation may be submitted from a colleague in the new field, if appropriate.
  5. A concise curriculum vitae, no more than five pages in length.

A small committee, convened by my office, will select one proposal to go forward to Mellon.  The institutional letter of endorsement will be provided at that time if your proposal is selected.  We will notify the author immediately so that so that s/he can undertake any further refinements of the proposal and finalize the materials and budget for submission through Mellon’s online portal.  The deadline for our submission to Mellon is September 27, 2019.

Applicants should familiarize themselves with the fellowship-specific application guidelines described online here[mellon.org].

If you are considering submitting a proposal or have additional questions, please inform Helen Koh, Director of Institutional Giving and Strategic Initiatives (hkoh@gc.cuny.edu) as soon as possible.

Meet Writing Center Director Candidates

Dear Students and Colleagues,

As a reminder, our second candidate for the Writing Center director position will be here on Monday, June 10. David Hershinow will conduct a workshop and then participate in an open discussion with students.

  • Workshop, 1:00 p.m., room C198
  • Open Discussion Session with Students, 2:00 p.m., room C198

Call for Contributors to Visible Pedagogy, 2019-2020

The Graduate Center’s Teaching and Learning Center (TLC) seeks contributors to its blog, Visible Pedagogy for academic year 2019-2020. Contributing writers will craft a series of posts over the course of the Fall semester on a topic they define, and Guest Editors will curate a series on a topic of their choice with writers they recruit.

The choice of topic is open, but the proposed series of posts should be linked by a unifying theme or rationale. For instance, new instructors might reflect on the challenges of teaching for the first time, while more experienced ones might think more deeply about a particular aspect of pedagogy, including methods, approaches, or technologies. Writers may also consider a particular question or challenge within higher education to explore in relation to their classroom practices. Applicants are encouraged to look at the past series of topics covered by our contributing writers, as well as this recent post by the editor.

Authors must be interested writing for a general audience in higher education and be willing to engage with the TLC Staff in the editorial process. Basic familiarity with Google docs and WordPress is preferred. Selected writers and editors will be asked to meet with TLC Director, Luke Waltzer, and Visible Pedagogy Editor, Kaitlin Mondello, at the start of the fall.

Interested applicants should email the materials below to Visible Pedagogy Editor Kaitlin Mondello at tlc@gc.cuny.edu by Monday, June 17. Posting will begin in September.

Application procedures for the two programs are below.

 

  1. Contributing Writers

Selected writers will commit to writing, revising, and publishing 3 blog posts of approximately 500-750 words for the Fall 2019 semester.

Please email a merged pdf or Word doc. with the following materials:

  • a 250-500 word description of your proposed series of posts, its rationale, and your reasons for wanting to write it
  • a sample of your non-or-para academic writing (preferably, a previous blog post or other public-facing writing on a digital platform), not to exceed 1500 words
  • CV
  1. Guest Editors Series

To apply as a guest editor, you should follow the same guidelines above for contributing writers, including proposing a series of related posts around a specific topic, BUT rather than author all the posts yourself, you will recruit three other writers to write one post each on your topic. These writers must meet the same eligibility requirements as other contributing writers. You will be responsible for writing your own introductory post to the series and to work with the other three writers on their posts for continuity and quality. Groups of more than four will be considered if there is a desire to co-edit or co-author.

The VP editor and TLC staff will work closely with the Guest Editors and their contributing writers. Editors and writers may be from the same department, but interdisciplinary perspectives are welcomed. Guest editors should secure commitments and topics from their contributing writers PRIOR to submitting the application to the TLC. Please include the names, disciplines, and topics for each contributing writer in your application for a Guest Editor series.

This program is modeled on proposing a conference panel or guest editing a special edition of a journal, and is designed to give graduate students additional experience and practice with these forms, as well as to examine a single topic from multiple perspectives.

Criteria for Selection

All applications will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

  • The clarity, creativity, and feasibility of the proposed series
  • The style and quality of the writing
  • The originality of the viewpoint(s) being represented
  • The role of the proposed series in the balance of perspectives and disciplines on the blog

To qualify, all applicants must be enrolled at the Graduate Center during the Fall 2019 semester. This opportunity is open to both Doctoral and Masters students.

Compensation

Contributing writers and guest editors will be paid an honoraria to be determined before the start of the fall semester. All funds will be disbursed as a lump sum as financial aid.

About VP

Visible Pedagogy is a blog dedicated to advancing and expanding conversations about teaching and learning at CUNY, edited by the staff of the Teaching & Learning Center at The Graduate Center, and collaboratively authored by CUNY faculty, staff, and students.

We are interested in both the theory and practice of teaching and learning. Our Reflective Practice series brings these ideas together as CUNY instructors reflect critically on ideas, issues, or challenges they’ve encountered in their teaching careers and their classrooms.

 

Due May 30 | CfP – Limits of Cinema / Cinema Limited?

University of Pittsburgh
Film and Media Studies Graduate Conference CFP
Limits of Cinema / Cinema Limited?
September 27-28, 2019
Keynote: Jeffrey Sconce (Northwestern University)

The cinematic medium has been historically shaped through several negotiations with its own limits and those imposed on it. Regulatory scrutiny of the moving image began as early as the peepshows of the Kinetoscope parlors. Formal censorship was soon implemented in many countries as a legal infrastructure serving in the moral guidance of youth and other demographics deemed vulnerable to irresponsible depictions of crimes and sex, as well as political propaganda. Continue reading Due May 30 | CfP – Limits of Cinema / Cinema Limited?

May 22 | TLC Grading Social

Wednesday May 22, Room 3317, 1-5pm

Dear GC Community,

It’s the time of the semester where students’ final work is piling up as we’re rushing to finish our own projects. For Graduate Center student instructors, grading student work at the end of the term can be overwhelming, lonely, and—even in successful courses—frustrating.

The Teaching and Learning Center is here to offer support. Join us on Wednesday, May 22nd from 1-5pm in room 3317 for our “Grading Social.” We will provide coffee, sweets, and camaraderie as instructors work through stacks of papers, blue books, blog posts, etc. Need a second or third eye on a assignment? We can provide those too.