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Creating Accessible Digital Course Content Webinar

Creating Accessible Digital Course Content Webinar

 July 30th, 11:00am to 12:00pm

August 13th (repeat session), 2:00pm to 3:00pm 

Register for the webinar on July 30th

Register for the repeat webinar on August 13th

CUNY Assistive Technology Services and the Media Accessibility Project invite you to join our live webinar to learn how to create accessible digital course content. This webinar is perfect for faculty in preparing course materials for the new semester and for those who want to increase their awareness on the importance of accessible content. We will be going over what makes a document accessible as well as steps on how to turn Microsoft Word and PDF documents into accessible content for students with all types of abilities and disabilities.

July 30th webinar link [zoom.us]

August 13th webinar link [zoom.us]

Due Sep 1 | Call for Book Chapters

The History of Sub-Saharan African Literatures on Film

Cinematic adaptations of sub-Saharan African literatures draw from a wide range of genres from West African folktales to Zulu legends, from Hausa popular literature to graphic novels, war narratives or Afro Bubblegum art. Departing from the notion that, like literature and cinema, cinematic adaptations are influenced by historical moments and political, social and economic transitions, The History of Sub-Saharan African Literatures on Film seeks chapter proposals that examine adaptations of African literatures–in their multilingual and multicultural contexts–in order to provide a comprehensive volume that spans linguistic regions and will serve as a resource to specialists and non-specialists alike. The volume aims to be a sort of adaptation archive and thus strongly urges chapter proposals that focus on Afrophone and Europhone countries throughout the sub-Saharan region. Moreover, if we consider adaptation as “réécriture” (re-writing) (Tcheuyap 2005), our study of multiple rewritings across time and space seeks to contribute to a rewriting or a rethinking of history, a reformulation of theories and even a rethinking or new direction for adaptation studies.

In individual chapters, the historical, political, social and/or economic contexts should frame discussions about, for instance, aesthetic choices in adaptation, what adaptation might bring to the discussion, or the choice itself of what to adapt to the screen and which screen, who chooses to adapt and why. Authors might focus on the aspect of storytelling through montage, framing, setting or on filmmaking as language, other language choices in films, music in adaptations, readership and viewership, and whether or how adaptation approaches have changed in response to or as a result of a particular historical moment or event. Contributors may choose to take up additional questions, such as: How have authorial approaches, storytelling techniques and media changed throughout the region’s cinematic history? How do storytellers deploy narrative techniques, approach narrative units and structures, and how do narrative styles merge or differ with regard to the choice of medium? What do filmmakers’ narrative choices bring to adaptation and what do those choices tell us about adaptation? Further, if African filmmaking has relied on the discourses and theoretical positioning in African literatures, how has the medium of film articulated those discourses and theories and expanded upon them? Altered them? How much has adaptation played a role in this process? Interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged, including from the fields of postcolonial theory, cultural studies, literary theory, translation theory, queer theory.

Chapters should situate adaptation within a particular historical, political, social or economic moment or time period, such as:

– First generation African filmmaking and adaptation, the Algiers Charter (1969) and political and aesthetic aims of African cinema, including the adaptation of myths, folktales, legends, plays, short stories and novels

– Adaptation, revolutions and revolutionary aesthetics and techniques; national identity and politics

– Popular media – popular theatre, market literature, video production; adaptation and Nollywood, Kannywood, Ghallywood, and in video production in Côte d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso, Gabon, Cameroon, Tanzania

– Adaptations of war narratives, child soldier narratives

-Adaptations and African screen media in the 21st century, modes of production, distribution, or of viewing

– Film languages, local and international actors, professional and non-professional actors, co-productions, global collaborations

Please submit a 250-300-word abstract with your name, title and affiliation to the editor, Dr. Sara Hanaburgh hanaburs@stjohns.edu by September 1, 2019. Include “Call for Book Chapters” in email subject. Accepted abstracts will be notified by September 20. Submission of full chapters (5,000-8,000 words) by February 20, 2020.

This book is under contract with Bloomsbury as part of the growing series, The History of World Literatures on Film, eds. Greg Semenza and Robert Hasenfratz.

Sara Hanaburgh, Ph. D

Assistant Professor of French

Department of Languages and Literatures

Faculty Mentor, International House

St. John’s University (Queens, NY)

hanaburs@stjohns.edu

 

Due Aug 12 | Applications for Advising Fellow Opening for M.A. in Liberal Studies 2019-2020

Advising Fellow Program – Fall 2019

The Advising Fellow Program aims to provide vital academic support to students in the MA in Liberal Studies (MALS) program while they study at the Graduate Center. MALS is looking to appoint one additional advising fellow for the academic year 2019-2020; the provisional start date is October 1, 2019. The Advising Fellows will provide individualized academic support to the master’s students, guiding them in choosing courses, managing their work loads and meeting academic challenges, and enlisting faculty mentors to supervise their theses. The Fellows will be advanced doctoral students who have already successfully navigated their own Graduate Center course requirements and who will be able to share their wisdom and experience with the master’s students. Carefully chosen for their interpersonal skills and judgment, the Fellows will be accessible and open to students while also providing academic guidance. Continue reading Due Aug 12 | Applications for Advising Fellow Opening for M.A. in Liberal Studies 2019-2020

Fall 2019 Professional Development Seminars

Students may register online for these courses, they are listed in the course schedule under “Professional Development”.  Course numbers are listed below. 

The courses are 0 credits and do not appear on student transcripts; they are free of charge and open to all matriculated Graduate Center students.

 PDEV 79400  Advanced Spoken English: Teaching and Presentation Skills

GC:  Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 5382, 0 credits, Prof. O’Shields [57280]

This course is designed to help students improve their spoken English in a variety of academic and casual settings through guided instruction of American-style conversation and direct instruction of spoken English fluency and pronunciation skills.  Additionally, students will be instructed in the standard methods and style of teaching and presenting for the American university classroom.  Students will also be discussing and learning about American culture via themes and topics that are relevant to the students’ interests. Continue reading Fall 2019 Professional Development Seminars

Due Sep 30 | NEMLA CFP: Theorizing Transmediality in its Transnational Contexts

Panel Co-Directors: Leonardo Nole’ and Joseph Boisvere

Theorizing Transmediality in its Transnational Contexts

The study of literature has always relied upon the traversal of borders of various kinds, both inter and intra nationally. This panel will engage with issues of literary study across geographical and cultural borders as well as the boundaries between literary and audio-visual media in the contemporary digital age. As the field of screen studies has been informed by theoretical frameworks originating in the field of literary studies, we ask how the interpretation of literary texts is informed by disciplines that are only now, in the digital age, being born. As digital technologies intensify movement of media across traditional notions of borders between various communities, how can we model the traversal of literary analysis across not only such borders but the bounds of medium? In the digital age of increasing access to literary and audio/visual materials, how is transmediality related to transnational and transcultural transposition? We welcome papers that discuss the engagement with texts both on the page and on the screen from a theoretical or hermeneutical perspective as well as papers that apply this logic to specific case studies.

Deadline for submissions: September 30, 2019.

250-word abstracts must be submitted online through the NeMLA website at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18091 [cfplist.com]before September 30, 2019. Individual presentations should not be longer than 7-8 minutes, in order to have enough time for the discussion.

June 17 | Workshops

Time Management Workshop
Monday, June 17, 2019, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Graduate Center, room 3312

In this workshop, we will discuss how to schedule time and keep oneself accountable to academic research and writing goals and deadlines, particularly during unstructured time periods such as the summer. Please RSVP: If you’re planning on coming to our workshop, please RSVP using our event registration form.

Companionable Writing (Summer 2019)
Monday, June 3, 2019 – Thursday, July 27, 2019
See weekly schedule below.
Graduate Center, room 3312

Weekly Schedule
In June and July, Writing Services will be hosting regular Companionable Writing sessions on the following days and times:

  • Mondays, 2-4pm through July 29
  • Tuesdays, 10am-12noon through July 30
  • Wednesdays, 2-4pm through July 31
  • Wednesday, 5-7pm on June 12, 19, and 26
  • Thursdays, 10am-12noon through July 25

Feel free to join us for a single day, once a week, or whenever your schedule allows.

About Companionable Writing

What is Companionable Writing? Companionable Writing is an opportunity to spend two solid hours of work either in person or digitally with other people doing the same thing. A writing consultant will host each session.

What happens at a session? Think of a session as Sustained Silent Writing time. This is a relaxed environment, you can drop in and out as you need. If you wish to set a goal for the session you can do so. At the end of the session we may chitchat for a bit in a companionable way.

Where do I go? Most sessions take place in room 3312. In the event that a session takes place in another location, a sign will be posted on 3312.

How do I join remotely? To join remotely send an email to writinghelp@gc.cuny.edu or a tweet to @gcwwritinghelp at least fifteen minutes before the start of the session and let us know you would like to join. You will then get an invite to a digital platform that will allow you to see and speak to the room and allow people in the room to see and speak to you.

What else do I need to know? We provide coffee and tea. Feel free to bring snacks. There are comfortable rolling chairs and a limited number of outlets. There may be computers accessible in a nearby room.

Questions?

If you have further questions, or want to join us remotely, please email writinghelp@gc.cuny.edu.