College Assistant Position, Career Planning Office

The Office of Career Planning & Professional Development at the Graduate Center is seeking to hire a College Assistant to help with the implementation of the Enhancing STEM Career Development project, funded by the CUNY Office of Continuing Education and Workforce Programs via the Career Success Initiative. (Read more about this initiative here: http://www.naceweb.org/career-readiness/best-practices/initiative-boosts-career-competitiveness-of-cuny-grads/.)

The Enhancing STEM Development project is an intensive program of professional development for the Graduate Center’s STEM students that will build their communication skills, strengthen postgraduate career outcomes, and heighten coordination between the Graduate Center and the campus-based labs.  This is a temporary position which will last from late January-early February 2019 to June 30, 2019

For more information and how to apply: https://www.gc.cuny.edu/About-the-GC/Administrative-Services/Human-Resources/Employment-Opportunities/Detail?id=47233

Dec 19 | TLC Grading Social

It’s the time of the semester where students’ final work is piling up and we’re rushing to finish our own projects too. For Graduate Center student instructors, grading student work at the end of the term can be overwhelming, lonely, and—even in successful courses—frustrating.

The Teaching and Learning Center is here to offer support. Join us on Wednesday, December 19th from 1-5pm in room 3317 for our “Grading Social.” We will provide coffee, sweets, and camaraderie as instructors work through stacks of papers, blue books, blog posts, etc. Need a second or third eye on a assignment? We can provide those too.

Check out this past post “Grading Tips from the TLC” on Visible Pedagogy and watch @GCTLC #amgrading on Twitter for more grading tips (and share your own!) starting Monday, December 17th.

Sincerely,

Your Colleagues at the TLC

Deadline Jan 21 | CfP – Screening Performance, Performing Screens: New Projections in Theatre and Media”

Screening Performance, Performing Screens: New Projections in Theatre and Media

May 13-14, 2018

The Graduate Center, CUNY

In the streets, in our homes, in our hands; in public and private; in work, leisure, and social relations; ubiquitous and invisible, tangible or porous, screens are constructing a new reality. Artistic practices and critical theories are rapidly evolving to address this change of paradigm in communication, perception, and being. This conference aims to gather scholars and artists from multiple disciplines around the trope of the screen with its multiple resonances, to explore as-yet-unseen avenues of understanding across media. Continue reading Deadline Jan 21 | CfP – Screening Performance, Performing Screens: New Projections in Theatre and Media”

Deadline Jan 28 | Early Research Initiative/PublicsLab Fellowships in Interdisciplinary Research in the Service of Public Knowledge

The Carnegie Foundation initiative on doctoral education uses the label “steward” to convey a role for scholars that transcends accomplishments and skills: it has an ethical and political dimension. “Self-identifying as a steward,” Chris Golde of Stanford says, “implies adopting a sense of purpose that is larger than oneself” or one’s own discipline.  Students and faculty at the Graduate Center have a rich history of conducting interdisciplinary work that seeks to enrich public knowledge and public discourse. Continue reading Deadline Jan 28 | Early Research Initiative/PublicsLab Fellowships in Interdisciplinary Research in the Service of Public Knowledge

Deadline Dec 17 | Open Pedagogy Fellowships

The Graduate Center Library:
Deadline to submit: Monday, December 17th, 2018, midnight
Open Pedagogy Fellowships

The Library seeks applications for up to ten Open Pedagogy Fellows for the Spring 2019 semester, each carrying a $2500 stipend. The Fellowship experience will enhance participants’ understanding of open pedagogy and their ability to employ elements of open pedagogy in their teaching. Throughout the Fellowship, a variety of concepts relating to open pedagogy will be introduced, including but not limited to: evaluating, supplementing, and teaching with Open Educational Resources (OER), integrating zero-cost course materials, and licensing, copyright, and fair use as it pertains to OER. Continue reading Deadline Dec 17 | Open Pedagogy Fellowships

Deadline Jan 28 | CFP – University of Michigan Grad Student Conference – Making History Public(s)

CFP: University of Michigan 2019 Graduate Student Conference in U.S. History
Making History Public(s): Presenting the Collective
Friday May 10 and Saturday May 11, 2019
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

The United States is comprised of publics. Filtered through media, politics, and social, cultural and economic life, American publics materialize through national, international, state, and local avenues. At what point do they become visible? How do American bodies become public? What are the consequences of these processes?

“Making History Public(s)” will interrogate the creation of publics in the United States, broadly defined. Papers might investigate the making of publics in any number of ways: as citizenry or voting block; as audience or consumer; as the product of, or precursor to political mobilization or disruption; as transnational formation; as agent or passive actor. American publics might be defined spatially or ideologically, shaped through communication, proximity, or knowledge. They might be determined institutionally, informally, or discursively.

At the same time, this conference will investigate the ways in which publics become both producers of, and audiences for historical knowledge. We seek papers that position the historical actor and themselves as part of the active production of history, considering the role of presentation, display, exhibition, and preservation. What is the role of art, visual culture, sound, and material in making history accessible to academic and public audiences, and students? This might also include scholars working in pedagogy, digital humanities, museum studies, mapping, and other fields.

Our keynote speaker is Professor Ellen Noonan, Director of the Archives and Public History Program at New York University. She is the author of The Strange Career of Porgy and Bess: Race, Culture, and America’s Most Famous Opera (University of North Carolina, 2012), and her various digital history projects include: The American Social History Project, Mission US, and The Lost Museum.

Scholars working in all periods of American history, and in various modes of interdisciplinarity are welcome! Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words and a CV to the conference planning committee at umusgradconference@gmail.com. Proposals are due by Sunday, January 28, 2019.

Deadline Jan 10 | Connect New York Fellowships

Graduate Center Early Research Initiative/Digital Initiatives

Connect New York Fellowships

Application Deadline: Wednesday, January 30, 2019, 5pm

Located in the heart of Manhattan, the Graduate Center has long been a central hub for intellectual and scholarly conversations in New York City. Moreover, it has a long history of fostering and producing scholarly work focused on the city itself, knowledge which draws upon and contributes to the complex communities of New York City and beyond.

In the spirit of this history, the Early Research Initiative in collaboration with the GC Digital Initiatives invites applications for new research fellowships for Summer 2019. These $4,000 fellowships will be offered to Graduate Center Ph.D. students from any program conducting research on New York City and its environs (including, but not limited to: the city’s natural and artificial environments, its architectural landscapes, its infrastructure, city planning, city politics, its prominence as a global and economic hub, the city’s political, cultural, and social histories, its foodways, its flows of population, its communities, its ethnoscapes, soundscapes,  mediascapes, and ideoscapes, and its evolving urban ecosystems).

The primary responsibilities of the award winners will be to produce a dissertation proposal or dissertation chapter by September 2019; a condensed and public facing version of this research will be showcased on the Provost’s website, as part of a new initiative in support of this theme. Profiles for previous fellowship recipients can be seen here: https://connectny.commons.gc.cuny.edu/

In addition, fellowship recipients will work in collaboration with a team of digital fellows to produce materials for their own individual research profiles for the ConnectNY site (including public facing blog posts, project descriptions, short filmed interviews, and accompanying visual materials) which will be due in mid-August. Additional opportunities for social media contributions are possible.

Successful proposals will clearly explain one or more of the following:

  • how your work advances knowledge about or for New York and surrounding areas
  • the significance of your work to your own field and to the public
  • how your work directly impacts the city
  • any innovative aspect of your research methodology or communication platform which might lend itself to public display (for example, data visualizations, websites, maps, or other form of scholarly product beyond writing)
  • a brief account of how this project will further your progress in your program

To apply please send a detailed letter of interest (up to three pages) describing your project that addresses the above points, a c.v., a current Graduate Center transcript (students may submit the unofficial student copy that can be printed from CUNYFirst), and a letter of support from your primary advisor.

Instructions for submitting your application:

  • Please combine the above materials (except for the letter of recommendation) into a SINGLE file (either as a pdf document or a word document).

Use the following format when naming your document: Last Name, First Name, Program

Please use your graduate center email address when sending the file.

Instructions for Faculty Recommenders

  • Prepare your reference letter as a regular word or pdf document.
  • Please use the following format when naming your document:

Student Last Name, First Name

Application Deadline: Wednesday, January 30, 2019, 5pm

Questions about the program can be directed to dfaherty@gc.cuny.edu Continue reading Deadline Jan 10 | Connect New York Fellowships

Dec 7 | Reimagining the Humanities for the Good of the Public Seminar and Information Session

Reimagining the Humanities for the Good of the Public
Thursdays, 2-4 pm in Spring 2019
Professor Bianca Williams

As part of The Graduate Center’s new Mellon Initiative “Transforming Doctoral Education for the Public Good,” this seminar will offer students the opportunity to both reimagine the process of doctoral study, and identify how they want their training in the humanities (and humanities-adjacent disciplines) to serve the good of the public. Professor Williams, and PublicsLab Director Stacy Hartman, will offer an information session on the seminar and the Lab THIS Friday, December 7, at 11:00 am in the Provost’s Conference Room in suite 8113. If you cannot make this info session, there will be another offered in January, with a virtual option for those who cannot make it to campus that day.

Continue reading Dec 7 | Reimagining the Humanities for the Good of the Public Seminar and Information Session

Dec 11 | Fake Journals & Conferences: What to Know about the Faux – Jill Cirasella

Title: Fake Journals and Conferences: What to Know about the Faux

Date: Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Time: 12:30pm – 2:00pm

Speaker: Jill Cirasella, Associate Librarian for Public Services & Scholarly Communication (Graduate Center)

Abstract: As a researcher, you are eager to publish your work in journals and present at conferences. But don’t let your eagerness allow you to be fooled by fake (often called “predatory”) journals or conferences. These low-quality outlets exist for the sole purpose of profit, not for the dissemination of peer-reviewed research. Indeed, they frequently lie about their peer review practices and engage in other forms of deceit. Come learn how to spot these bad actors, and how to critically evaluate any journal or conference before submitting a paper or proposal.

Background of Speaker: Jill Cirasella is the Graduate Center’s Associate Librarian for Public Services & Scholarly Communication. In this position, she oversees reference, instruction, outreach, circulation, interlibrary loan, and scholarly communication services. Her research focus is scholarly communication, broadly construed: her projects include anxieties surrounding open access, attitudes about practice-based library literature, and the professional experiences of hard-of-hearing librarians. She serves on the boards of three open access journals, including the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, and is driven by a commitment to open scholarship.

Certificate Program

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