Category Archives: Call for Content

Feb 26 | CFP – Abstract Writing Workshop

Do you see a conference in your future? If so, please join us for the Writing Services CFP – Abstract Writing Workshop.

About the Workshop

On Tuesday, February 26, 2019, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm, in room 3317, we’ll meet for a brief a presentation detailing some of the “best practices” of CFP answering and abstract composition. After the presentation, students will workshop their CFPs in peer editing groups. We ask that students bring a paper copy of the CFP and the abstract they’d like to workshop.

Please RSVP

If you’re planning on coming to our workshop, please RSVP using our event registration form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSch6I5NKGfXG_sjRdevhJ65q6nAEFULq2JeBGDip7ma9JIXGQ/viewform.

See flyer here CFP – Abstract Writing Workshop

Deadline Feb 28 | CfP – “Black Lives,” CUNY ESA Conference

Call For Papers

CUNY Graduate Center English Student Association Conference:
BLACK LIVES

SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED TO FEBRUARY 28, 2019 

Conference date: Friday, April 12, 2019 

CUNY Graduate Center
New York, NY 

KEYNOTES BY:
Michelle Wright, Emory University
Rafael Walker, Baruch College

“Black Lives” has emerged in recent years as a conceptual touchstone following the wake of Black Lives Matter, a galvanizing social movement of public protest against the persistence of institutionalized forms of anti-black violence that besiege Black individuals and communities on a daily basis, both within the United States and across a range of geopolitical contexts. The phrase implicitly challenges nationalist and global concepts of humanity that do not include blackness as a viable sign of life and citizenship. As critics such as Paul Gilroy, Denise Ferreira da Silva, Robert Reid-Pharr and  Henry Louis Gates Jr. have noted, “universal humanism” has been historically built upon a constitutive rejection of black being. To push back against such entrenched conceptual repudiations of black particularity, we take a cue from Jamaican philosopher and novelist Sylvia Wynter, who argues that black particularity paradoxically retains a utopian impulse for recognizing “our collective agency and authorship of our genres of being human” (2006). We intend for the conference to respond to the urgent need to think about the impact and meaning of “Black Lives” both as a touchstone for contemporary activism as well as a scholarly heuristic for research across a range of fields and disciplines. By doing so, we hope to make resonant the potentiality of blackness to signify as a radical node of meaning and being across a range of identitarian and relational articulations. Continue reading Deadline Feb 28 | CfP – “Black Lives,” CUNY ESA Conference

Deadline May 15 | Call for Submissions – Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy
General Issue

Issue Editors:
Shelly Eversley, Baruch College, CUNY
Krystyna Michael, The Graduate Center, CUNY

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy (JITP) seeks scholarly work that explores the intersection of technology with teaching, learning, and research. We are interested in contributions that take advantage of the affordances of digital platforms in creative ways. We invite both textual and multimedia submissions employing interdisciplinary and creative approaches in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. Besides scholarly papers, the submissions can consist of audio or visual presentations and interviews, dialogues, or conversations; creative/artistic works; manifestos; or other scholarly materials, including work that addresses the labor and care considerations of academic technology projects. Continue reading Deadline May 15 | Call for Submissions – Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy

Deadline Feb 15 | Call for submissions: “Cinema and Social Conflicts”

CALL FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS

“Cinema and Social Conflicts,” Zapruder World: An International Journal for the History of Social Conflict 6 (2019)
DANIEL FAIRFAX, ANDRÉ KEIJI KUNIGAMI, AND LUCA PERETTI, eds.

[zapruderworld.org]Introduction

Cinema has played a pivotal role in recounting, reinventing, and depicting the world we live in. Most major historical events have been represented in cinema, from the world wars to the fall of the Berlin Wall, while several others have been left invisible in the filmic archive. This issue focuses on the relationship between cinema and social conflicts: revolutions, protests, riots. How does cinema not only describe, but also inscribe and produce social struggles—influencing their present and future? We are interested not only in how cinema represents historical events, such as the Russian Revolution, anti-colonial struggles, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, or the 1968 unrests, but we also want to look at cinema as a site of conflict, in different parts of the world: its role in fueling revolutionary consciousness, in mediating spaces of conflicts through performative documentary practices, in strategies of self-representation of organizations, in the disputes over memories of struggles through different archival practices, and in fighting mainstream cinematic representation. We also welcome contributions that address how cinematic practices have expanded into new forms of networked organizing through social media, shaping at once new modes of transnational resistance and of filmmaking.

Aims and Objectives

[zapruderworld.org]This volume of Zapruder World aims at bringing different perspectives on how cinema has functioned as a means to narrate and consolidate the memory of social conflicts, and as site of dispute, mediation, and production of struggles. Be it in film theory, grassroots guerrilla filmmaking, or transnational networks of alternative distribution and exhibition, cinema not only represents but also produces, imagines, and enables different modes of political struggle. We call for papers that go beyond the analysis of the issue of historical representation, addressing how cinema has contributed to social struggles in any and all intersections of nation, class, sex, and race. We are equally interested in contributions that look at how the history of social conflicts has contributed to the shaping of cinema.

Topics and Themes

We invite contributions focusing on any area of the world, which address one or more of the following themes:

§  Cinema and revolutions

§  Cinema and/as anti-colonial struggle

§  Cinema, new media, and networked modes of resistance

§  Guerrilla cinema

§  Cinema and activism

§  Political film theory

§  Cinema and territorial conflict

§  Indigenous cinema

§  Film and labor

§  Cinema, sex, gender, race

§  Cinema and incarceration

§  Politics of distribution and exhibition

§  Film history and the politics of archive

§  Cinema and strikes

In addition to scholarly articles, we invite submissions of non-essay form original work, such as photo essays, videos, interviews, drawings, comics, songs, hyperlinks to online resources, multimedia, etc., both accompanying the articles themselves and as standalone contributions. We encourage authors to think about incorporating multimedia both into their pieces proposed for Zapruder World and in the sections we have created on the journal’s website (e.g. “Yesterday [zapruderworld.org]” and “Today [zapruderworld.org]“).

Volume Deadlines & Schedule

Abstracts in English (200-400 words) shall be sent to submissions@zapruderworld.orgby February 15, 2019. All contributors will be informed about the status of their abstract submission by March 5, 2019. The full article (6,000-9,000 words) will be expected by June 15, 2019.

For information on Zapruder World’s peer review process or submission instructions, please see the following URLs:

§  Peer Review Procedures: http://www.zapruderworld.org/peer-review-procedures/ [zapruderworld.org]

§  Submissions Instructions: http://www.zapruderworld.org/submissions-instructions/ [zapruderworld.org]

Deadline Jan 21 | CfP – Screening Performance, Performing Screens: New Projections in Theatre and Media”

Screening Performance, Performing Screens: New Projections in Theatre and Media

May 13-14, 2019

The Graduate Center, CUNY

In the streets, in our homes, in our hands; in public and private; in work, leisure, and social relations; ubiquitous and invisible, tangible or porous, screens are constructing a new reality. Artistic practices and critical theories are rapidly evolving to address this change of paradigm in communication, perception, and being. This conference aims to gather scholars and artists from multiple disciplines around the trope of the screen with its multiple resonances, to explore as-yet-unseen avenues of understanding across media. Continue reading Deadline Jan 21 | CfP – Screening Performance, Performing Screens: New Projections in Theatre and Media”

Deadline Jan 28 | CFP – University of Michigan Grad Student Conference – Making History Public(s)

CFP: University of Michigan 2019 Graduate Student Conference in U.S. History
Making History Public(s): Presenting the Collective
Friday May 10 and Saturday May 11, 2019
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

The United States is comprised of publics. Filtered through media, politics, and social, cultural and economic life, American publics materialize through national, international, state, and local avenues. At what point do they become visible? How do American bodies become public? What are the consequences of these processes?

“Making History Public(s)” will interrogate the creation of publics in the United States, broadly defined. Papers might investigate the making of publics in any number of ways: as citizenry or voting block; as audience or consumer; as the product of, or precursor to political mobilization or disruption; as transnational formation; as agent or passive actor. American publics might be defined spatially or ideologically, shaped through communication, proximity, or knowledge. They might be determined institutionally, informally, or discursively.

At the same time, this conference will investigate the ways in which publics become both producers of, and audiences for historical knowledge. We seek papers that position the historical actor and themselves as part of the active production of history, considering the role of presentation, display, exhibition, and preservation. What is the role of art, visual culture, sound, and material in making history accessible to academic and public audiences, and students? This might also include scholars working in pedagogy, digital humanities, museum studies, mapping, and other fields.

Our keynote speaker is Professor Ellen Noonan, Director of the Archives and Public History Program at New York University. She is the author of The Strange Career of Porgy and Bess: Race, Culture, and America’s Most Famous Opera (University of North Carolina, 2012), and her various digital history projects include: The American Social History Project, Mission US, and The Lost Museum.

Scholars working in all periods of American history, and in various modes of interdisciplinarity are welcome! Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words and a CV to the conference planning committee at umusgradconference@gmail.com. Proposals are due by Sunday, January 28, 2019.

Deadline Dec 1st | CfP – Wearing Out the Image: 2019 Yale Graduate Conference on Film and Media Studies

12th Annual Yale Film and Media Studies Graduate Student Conference
February 8-9, 2019
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven, CT

Keynote Speaker: Elena Gorfinkel, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, King’s College London

Call for Papers:

“What weariness makes possible, weariness makes difficult.”
Maurice Blanchot, The Infinite Conversation

Exhaustion, fatigue, torpor, weariness, abeyance—this constellation of affects has come to define the default state of the everyday in our global and information-driven economies. As the world of labor permeates leisurely time in sleepless societies, depleting the domains of attentive, affective, and cognitive work, states of deprivation are normalized as modes of material and psychological engagement with the world. Precarity has become the necessary precondition for and inextricable product of labor. The imperative to exhaust oneself to secure a livelihood that nevertheless remains depleted creates a circular logic which extends well beyond the sphere of the human. Our deprivation thus appears to be an unending process rather than a completed state. We might ask, then: can exhaustion constitute a potential reservoir for political capaciousness? Or is exhaustion a paradoxical site for lateral agency, where the promises of utopianism are nothing but the vestigial remains of obsolete politics? Continue reading Deadline Dec 1st | CfP – Wearing Out the Image: 2019 Yale Graduate Conference on Film and Media Studies

The Advocate Call for Contributions

NEVER SUBMIT, CONTRIBUTE!

This fall, the Advocate invites everyone to start a conversation on Non-Democratic Futures in the wake of important elections held all over the world this year. For a while now, we have seen authoritarian leaderships rise to power through the popular vote in every continent. We also saw the rise of an Anti-Globalist discourses sewing together an alliance that connects these forces together as they claim to be fighting against elites and in the name of the common man. How have we come to this, and what can this politics of the New Right produce to our near futures?

We are interested in all types of analyses and perspectives on the topic. From historicity to futurology; from general trends to specific cases; from political institutions to social movements; and everything in between. We also welcome ways to conceptualize a new response on the part of the Left to these emerging challenges; new forms to re-build democracy, or even forays into how we can move beyond democracy in the future. Above all we are interested in sharing with our community at CUNY different ways to look at what the future promises us and what we can promise to the future.

We are looking forward to receiving contributions for the next issue by December 10th, if possible. We understand the end of semester can be though, so if you want to contribute to this topic but can`t make it through the deadline, we are still interested in your ideas, so send us anyway once you are done as we may at least publish it in our next issue. Also, if you have your own pressing topic you wish to share your ideas on, don`t hesitate to send us your contribution, as they may also make the cut in our general section.

Please do send your impressions, your thoughts, and your ideas to our new Editor-in-Chief, Rafael Munia, at rmunia@gradcenter.cuny.edu. Also ‘cc’ to advocate@cunydsc.org.

And yes, we pay for articles!

The Advocate pays $100-$120 for articles that are around 1500-2000 words, and about $150-$200 for longer essays that entail more research and labor. Other contributions like reviews and photo essays will also be compensated for at competitive rates. And of course, we promise enthusiastic editorial support and love from our team!

We look forward to some excellent contributions from you!

Deadline Jan 10 | Call for Proposals – The Relevance of Reading, Translating and Adapting

The Relevance of Reading, Translating and Adapting

Boston College RLL Graduate Student Conference

March 22nd-23rd 2019

While modern society generally strives for progressivism in its approach to various domains of art and science it cannot be denied that it still heavily draws from pre-existing works. The process of renewing classics entails transformation, adaptation and translation in a bid to make the inaccessible accessible and thus relevant to current times and modern audiences.

A clear example of this is when publishing houses produce new versions of the canonic works translated into modern language (adapted versions of Don Quixote) or with a simplified structure (prose versions of Dante’s Comedy). Additionally, a possible study can encompass the transformation of books into movies and theatrical performances (for instance different versions of Les Misérables). Continue reading Deadline Jan 10 | Call for Proposals – The Relevance of Reading, Translating and Adapting

Deadline Dec. 1 | CfP – 2019 Yale Film and Media Studies Graduate Student Conference

Wearing Out The Image
12th Annual Yale Film and Media Studies Graduate Student Conference
February 8-9, 2019
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven, CT

Keynote Speaker: Elena Gorfinkel, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, King’s College London

Call for Papers:

“What weariness makes possible, weariness makes difficult.”
Maurice Blanchot, The Infinite Conversation

Exhaustion, fatigue, torpor, weariness, abeyance—this constellation of affects has come to define the default state of the everyday in our global and information-driven economies. As the world of labor permeates leisurely time in sleepless societies, depleting the domains of attentive, affective, and cognitive work, states of deprivation are normalized as modes of material and psychological engagement with the world. Precarity has become the necessary precondition for and inextricable product of labor. The imperative to exhaust oneself to secure a livelihood that nevertheless remains depleted creates a circular logic which extends well beyond the sphere of the human. Our deprivation thus appears to be an unending process rather than a completed state. We might ask, then: can exhaustion constitute a potential reservoir for political capaciousness? Or is exhaustion a paradoxical site for lateral agency, where the promises of utopianism are nothing but the vestigial remains of obsolete politics?

Continue reading Deadline Dec. 1 | CfP – 2019 Yale Film and Media Studies Graduate Student Conference